Our Data Mining Squad in China has been reinforced, again

Recently, our data mining squad in Beijing has been reinforced in further, with four students from various Chinese universities:

Luo Xi Zhang Meijiao
Wang Yuhan Liu Zeng

Miss Luo Xi, a bachelor student on Chinese history, from the school of Chinese Classics, Renmin University of China.

Miss Zhang Meijiao, a bachelor student on ancient history of China, from the school of Chinese Classics, Renmin University of China.

Miss Wang Yuhan, soon a master student in the department of Chinese Literature, Peking University, on the topics of relationship between literature and image, Feminism and modern literature.

Miss Liu Zeng, a bachelor student on literary theory and creative writing, from Renmin University of China.

Presentation at European Social Science History Conference (ESSHC) in Belfast

On 4-7 April 2018, our researchers Robin Philips and Zipeng Zhang attended the European Social Science History Conference (ESSHC), organized by the International Institute of Social History (IISH).

At this event, the researchers presented their forthcoming paper which focused on the business adventures of an unlucky Dutch entrepreneur in the periphery of Imperial China at the end of the 19th century. A digital copy of the Powerpoint presentation can be found here.

Abstract of the paper: In contrast to most developing countries, per capita foreign direct investment (FDI) in China has been relatively low at the start of both the 20th and the 21st century. In attempting to explain the cause behind this long-run low amount of FDI in China, economic historians came up with two explanations: an inefficient central bureaucracy and a protectionist attitude upheld by local officials and population. As a consequence, it is argued, most Western entrepreneurs at the end of the 19th century were circumventing the Chinese regulations by wielding the diplomatic and military power of their – mostly European – country of origin. In a detailed case study, we follow the well-documented case of the Dutch entrepreneur Pieter Bakels, who attempted to open up a gold mining enterprise in cooperation with a local Mongolian king at the end of the 19th century. We find evidence that, rather than the result of national regulations or policy, mostly local government officials and the lack of professionalism of foreign entrepreneurs were to blame for the failure of foreign direct investments in China

Report: Workshop Economic Geography of Industrialization

The HINDI research group, in collaboration with the International Institute of Social History (IISH) organized at Thu-Fri 22-23 March 2018 a workshop on the economic geography of long-run industrialization (approx. 1800 – 2010) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Here, economists, economic historians, and economic geographers discussed the quantitative long-run regional process of industrialization, as well as the empirical and political conclusions one can derive from it. Below, preliminary versions of the papers can be found, which are expected to be bundled in an edited volume. For the people seeking more information, are advised to contact the organizers Bas van Leeuwen and Robin Philips via the contact form.



STRUCTURE OF THE WORKSHOP/VOLUME

Part 1: Regional Industrialization in Western Europe
Sebastian Keibek (Cambridge University) and Leigh Shaw-Taylor (Cambridge University): The regional foundations on which the world’s first industrial nation was built. abstract paper
Robin Philips (IISH) and Erik Buyst (University of Leuven): Local and regional industrial development in the Low Countries, 1820 – 2010. abstract paper
Part 2: Regional Industrialization in the Eurasian Periphery
Stefan Nikolić (University of Groningen) and Leonard Kukić (London School of Economics): Regional industrialization of Yugoslavia in the long-run. abstract paper **
Anna Missiaia (Lund University): Old patterns die Hard: regional aspects of Italian industrialization in the long run. abstract paper
Erdem Kabadayı (Koç University). Long term regional dynamics of industrialization, from the late Ottoman Empire to the Republic of Turkey in the twentieth century, 1850-2000. abstract paper
Part 3: Regional Industrialization in Asia
Xu Yi (Guangxi Normal University / IISH), Bas van Leeuwen (IISH), Lin Wang (Guangxi Normal University) and Zhihua Tang (Guangxi Normal University). Regional industrial development along the Yangtze and Zhujiang rivers, ca. 1914-2004. abstract paper
Bas van Leeuwen (IISH), Jieli Li (IISH) and Zipeng Zhang (Utrecht University): regional industrialization in the basic metals sector in China (1850-2010). paper
Jean-Pascal Bassino (University of Lyon), Kyoji Fukao (Hitotsubashi University) and Tokihiko Settsu (Musashi University): The economic geography of Japanese industrialization (1800-2010). abstract paper
Part 4: A Thematic View on Regional Industrialization
Stijn Ronsse (Ghent University) and Glenn Rayp (Ghent University): The use of the Midelfarth-Knarvik model to study determinants of historical industrial locations. abstract paper
Robin Philips (IISH), Wouter Ronsijn (Ghent University) and Eric Vanhaute (Ghent University): Shifts from proto-industrialization to industrialization. abstract paper
Bas van Leeuwen (IISH), Peter Foldvari (University of Amsterdam), Robin Philips (IISH) and Meimei Wang (Utrecht University): Testing for co-location among manufacturing firms using micro-geographic data. abstract paper
Julio Martinez-Galarraga (University of Valencia) and Daniel Tirado (University of Barcelona): Market integration and economic geography in history: an overview. abstract
Patrizio Bianchi (University of Ferrara) and Sandrine Labory (University of Ferrara): Industrial policy for manufacturing revolutions. abstract

Please look here at the full program of the workshop in March 2018.

** At the request of the authors, the paper is only available on demand (by filling in the contact form of the HINDI website).

Hindi Team won the Sir Timothy Coghlan Prize for best paper in AEHR 2017

Recently, our article on Chinese historical GDP, Chinese National Income, ca. 1661-1933, has been awarded the 2017 Sir Timothy Coghlan Prize for the Best Paper Published in Australian Economic History Review (AEHR) in 2017. In this February, it will be officially announced in the Asia Pacific Economic Business History Conference 2018 in Australia.

The authors of this article were fully encouraged with this prize. This was a historical breakthrough for the Chinese academia, as for the FIRST time researchers from China won a Best Paper prize on the international economic history journals.

involved project member(s)

Bas van Leeuwen Xu Yi Zhang Zipeng
     

The Sir Timothy Coghlan Prize is awarded to the best paper appearing each year in Australian Economic History Review as voted by the editorial board. This prize has been issued by Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, and the publisher Wiley since 2006. It was named after Sir Timothy Coghlan (1855-1926), one of Australasia’s most eminent statisticians and historians.

Presentation at RSA ReHi-workshop on regional resilience (Leeuwarden)

On 14-16 January 2018, our researcher Robin Philips attended the 4th RSA ReHi-workshop ‘An historical account of regional resilience’ in Leeuwarden (the Netherlands), organized by the Regional Studies Association (RSA) and the RSA Research Network on Regional Economic and Policy History (ReHi).

At this event, he presented preliminary results of a forthcoming paper which focused on the long-term development of unemployment numbers at the municipal level in the Low Countries (Belgium and the Netherlands). The study identified correlations between human capital and early industrialization of regions. Interestingly, development paths such as these were also linked to higher unemployment figures in post-industrial times. The latter correlation, though, could not be explained by different levels of human capital – thus underscoring the need for further research. A digital copy of the Powerpoint presentation can be found here.

The workshop was carried out within the Framework of the  with support from the Fryske Akademy/Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences and the N.W. Posthumus Institute. More information and a full report on the workshop can be found here.

Lecture “History and Economic Development” in Shanghai

On October 21-22, 2017, our researcher Prof. Dr. Xu Yi was invited to lecture in the First Workshop for “History and Economic Development”, in Shanghai, China.

His presentation was “A Short Introduction to Historical Database Project“, in which he reviewed the Great Divergence debate, and introduced three Chinese historical database of the HINDI research team, i.e. Chinese National Income (1661-1933), Chinese Human Capital (1368-1911) and Chinese Industrialization (1850-2000).

More details are available in the Chinese report.

Workshop: Research Design Course 2017 in Cracow, Poland

On 6-8 November 2017, our researcher Robin Philips attended the ESTER Research Design Course 2017 at the Pedagogical University of Cracow (Cracow, Poland), and presented his research on the industrial development in the Netherlands and Belgium during the 19th and 20th century. A digital copy of his Powerpoint presentation can be found here.

The European graduate School for Training in Economic and Social Historical Research (ESTER) was established in 1991 as a European platform for postgraduate teaching. It involves more than 60 universities throughout Europe and offers high-level research training for PhD students in an international context. At present the network is organized by the N.W. Posthumus Institute, which is a graduate school for economic and social history in the Netherlands and Flanders.

Since the late 1990s, ESTER has promoted the Research Design Course (RDC). In this year, the annual Research Design Course was organized by Bartosz Ogórek (Pedagogical University of Cracow) and Mikołaj Malinowski (Lund University/WEast network).

Prof. Dr. Wu Songdi from Fudan University visited us

On Monday 19 June 2017, the HINDI Project team welcomed the visit of Prof. Dr. Wu Songdi and his wife in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Prof. Dr. Wu Songdi has been famous for his researches on the Chinese economic history, historical economic geography, Chinese population history, Chinese migration history, regional history of the coastal Southeastern China, and Chinese Maritime Customs history.

He obtained his PhD in History in 1992 and has been working in the Fudan University (Shanghai, China) since 1986. He was promoted to a full professor in 1999, and held the position of the Director in the Center for Historical Geographical Studies of Fudan University between 2010 and 2015. Since 2016, Prof. Dr. Wu Songdi has served as the Director in the International Research Center of Customs History and Customs Literature of Fudan University.

During the visit, Prof. Dr. Wu Songdi introduced his new researches and discussed various interesting topics on the Chinese economic history and the comparison with the West, with the HINDI Project team. Dr. Bas van Leeuwen also introduced the HINDI research project and the book series of The Quantitative Economic History of China. Prof. Wu expressed his appreciation for the effort and work of the HINDI Project team, and the HINDI Project team was impressed by Prof. Wu’s academic enthusiasm. Both sides looked forward to the possible future cooperation.

Our visiting fellow Dr. Guo Yongqin ,who coincidentally was a former student of Prof. Dr. Wu Songdi in the Fudan University, and the other HINDI Project members Robin Philips, Li Jieli and Zhang Zipeng also participated the reception.

Our Data Mining Squad in China has been reinforced

Since the recruitment of Dr. Ma Xi and Dr. Jiang Zhouqing in May, our data mining squad in China has been reinforced in further with three youths from several Chinese universities:

Li Jia Zhang Runze Xiao Faqiong
     

Mr. Li Jia, who is going to study Regional Economics in the School of Economics, Henan University, for a master degree.

Mr. Zhang Runze, who is going to study Economics in Shandong University, for a master degree.

Miss. Xiao Faqiong, a bachelor student who is studying Chinese Literature in the School of Liberal Arts, Renmin University of China.

Workshop Economic Geography of Long-Run Industrialization

The HINDI research group, in collaboration with the International Institute of Social History (IISH), will be organizing at Thu-Fri 22-23 March 2018 a workshop on the economic geography of long-run industrialization (approx. 1800 – 2010) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The aim of this workshop will be to bring together economists, economic historians, and economic geographers with an academic interest in both the quantitative long-run regional process of industrialization, as well as the empirical and political conclusions one can derive from it. Those interested in attending, are recommended to contact the organizers Bas van Leeuwen and Robin Philips via the contact form.


The Industrial Revolution and its aftermath presented one of the most fascinating topics in the field of economic history. Like a slick of oil, new manufacturing firms spread first over England, followed by Western Europe and eventually the rest of the world. However, it is not clear how and why this process of industrialization differed over time and across regions. Rather, debates continue about topics such as why industrial activity is spatially distributed and what factors drive agglomeration of production. Lack of data has so far inhibited the connection between theory and empirics as well as history and economics, rendering the answer to above questions problematic, even though some interesting empirical studies have emerged. This proposed workshop is thus intended to bring together empirical and theoretical studies in a coherent framework, to explain spatial development in industrialization over the past two centuries.

The central question of this workshop is how and why industrialization spread across regions and over time. To deal with this question, the workshop will be subdivided in five panels. After an “econography” of industrialization dealing with the various models of industrialization and, more importantly, their empirical implications in the opening remarks, panels 1 – 3 of this workshop will deal with specific case studies of regional industrialization over the Eurasian continent. Walking first through the historiography of spatial industrialization, each presenter will cover one particular region during the 19th and 20th century, including various Western, Eurasian and Asian countries. This not only makes it possible to test if existing theories on economic agglomeration can be globally applied, but also contributes to the debates on regional divergence and the role of economic integration and globalization. In panels 4 – 5 the various presentations, partly based on the previous chapters as well as the literature, deal with the question how the various theories can be used in the fields of economic history and economic geography.


WORKSHOP PROGRAM

Thursday 22 March 2018

10:20 Opening Remarks by Bas van Leeuwen (IISH)
10:30 Panel 1: Regional Industrialization in Western Europe
Sebastian Keibek (Cambridge University) and Leigh Shaw-Taylor (Cambridge University): The regional foundations on which the world’s first industrial nation was built. abstract
Robin Philips (IISH) and Erik Buyst (University of Leuven): Local and regional industrial development in the Low Countries, 1820 – 2010. abstract
Discussant: Ron Boschma (Utrecht University)
12:00 Lunch
13:00 Panel 2: Regional Industrialization in Asia
Xu Yi (Guangxi Normal University / IISH), Bas van Leeuwen (IISH), Lin Wang (Guangxi Normal University) and Zhihua Tang (Guangxi Normal University). Regional industrial development along the Yangtze and Zhujiang rivers, ca. 1914-2004. abstract
A BRIEF RESEARCH NOTE
Bas van Leeuwen (IISH), Jieli Li (IISH) and Zipeng Zhang (Utrecht University): regional industrialization in the basic metals sector in China (1850-2010).
Jean-Pascal Bassino (University of Lyon), Kyoji Fukao (Hitotsubashi University) and Tokihiko Settsu (Musashi University): The economic geography of Japanese industrialization (1800-2010). abstract
Discussant: Peer Vries (University of Vienna)
15:15 Coffee and Tea Break
15:30 Panel 3: Regional Industrialization in the European Periphery
Stefan Nikolić (University of Groningen) and Leonard Kukić (London School of Economics): Regional industrialization of Yugoslavia in the long-run. abstract
Anna Missiaia (Lund University): Old patterns die Hard: regional aspects of Italian industrialization in the long run. abstract
Erdem Kabadayı (Koç University). Long term regional dynamics of industrialization, from the late Ottoman Empire to the Republic of Turkey in the twentieth century, 1850-2000. abstract
Discussant: Gijs Kessler (IISH)
18:00 Drinks
18:30 Dinner

Friday 23 March 2018

10:15 Panel 4: A Thematic View on Regional Industrialization *
Stijn Ronsse (Ghent University) and Glenn Rayp (Ghent University): The use of the Midelfarth-Knarvik model to study determinants of historical industrial locations. abstract
Robin Philips (IISH), Wouter Ronsijn (Ghent University) and Eric Vanhaute (Ghent University): Shifts from proto-industrialization to industrialization. abstract
Bas van Leeuwen (IISH), Peter Foldvari (University of Amsterdam), Robin Philips (IISH) and Meimei Wang (Utrecht University): Testing for co-location among manufacturing firms using micro-geographic data. abstract
Discussants: Jan Luiten van Zanden (Utrecht University) and Oedzge Atzema (Utrecht University)
12:30 Final Discussion
13:00 Lunch

Please download here the full program of the workshop.

Please download here the full list of abstracts for the workshop presentations.

Please download here the travel instructions.

Please follow this page for the upcoming papers of all workshop presentations.


* The following presenters were unable to attend the workshop:

  • Julio Martinez-Galarraga (University of Valencia) and Daniel Tirado (University of Barcelona): Market integration and economic geography in history: an overview. Please find here the abstract and paper.
  • Patrizio Bianchi (University of Ferrara) and Sandrine Labory (University of Ferrara): Industrial policy for manufacturing revolutions. Please find here the abstract and paper.

** At the request of the authors, the paper is only available on demand (by filling in the contact form of the HINDI website).