Where Do Ideas Come from?: The Relation between Book Production and Patents from the Industrial Revolution to the Present

when 2014
who Aurelian P. Plopeanu
Peter Foldvari
Bas van Leeuwen
Jan Luiten Van Zanden
what journal European Journal of Science and Theology
what paper Where Do Ideas Come from? The Relation between Book Production and Patents from the Industrial Revolution to the Present
language English

involved project member(s)

Bas van Leeuwen Peter Foldvari
   

abstract

Recently, more and more use is made from book production as a measure of the long-run development of human capital. However, its relation with technology and growth is often found to be small and changing over time. In this paper we try to establish the link between book production and the spread of “ideas” as proxied by patents both over time and between regions. Two mechanisms may be distinguished. First, in the initial phase of economic development, the production of books may stimulate the accumulation of knowledge already present in society. After such an accumulation is complete, books may advance a common research focus within a certain geographic space. Indeed, applying this to the case of England, we find that books had a significant role on the number of patents during the second Industrial Revolution. However, when education became increasingly important, the role of books eventually broke down in the second half of the twentieth century. This pattern does not hold true for less developed regions where, due to the lack of efficient education, linguistic fragmentation, an overwhelmingly oral culture, and a structural different kind of knowledge, book production stagnated and no knowledge could be imported (for example, via translated books).

keywords

book production, patents, ideas, education, economic development

citation format

MLA
Plopeanu, Aurelian P., et al. “Where do Ideas come from? The relation between book production and patents from the Industrial Revolution to the present.” (2014).
APA
Plopeanu, A. P., Foldvari, P., van Leeuwen, B., & Van Zanden, J. L. (2014). Where do Ideas come from? The relation between book production and patents from the Industrial Revolution to the present.
Chicago
Plopeanu, Aurelian P., Peter Foldvari, Bas van Leeuwen, and Jan Luiten Van Zanden. “Where do Ideas come from? The relation between book production and patents from the Industrial Revolution to the present.” (2014).
Harvard
Plopeanu, A.P., Foldvari, P., van Leeuwen, B. and Van Zanden, J.L., 2014. Where do Ideas come from? The relation between book production and patents from the Industrial Revolution to the present.
Vancouver
Plopeanu AP, Foldvari P, van Leeuwen B, Van Zanden JL. Where do Ideas come from? The relation between book production and patents from the Industrial Revolution to the present.

An Alternative Interpretation of “average years of education” in growth regressions

when 2009
who Péter Földvári

Bas van Leeuwen

what journal Applied Economics Letters
what paper An Alternative Interpretation of “average years of education” in growth regressions
language English

involved project member(s)

Bas van Leeuwen Peter Foldvari
   

abstract

The majority of the empirical literature uses average years of education as a proxy of the human capital stock. Based on Lucas (1988) we argue that the level of average years of education can also be seen as a proxy for the growth rate of the per capita human capital stock. This has fundamental impact on the interpretation of the coefficient and may explain some of the contradictory empirical results.

keywords

Human capital, education, economic growth, panel analysis

link to paper page of the journal website

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13504850701222178

citation format

MLA Földvári, Péter, and Bas van Leeuwen. “An alternative interpretation of ‘average years of education’in growth regressions.” Applied Economics Letters 16.9 (2009): 945-949
APA Földvári, P., & van Leeuwen, B. (2009). An alternative interpretation of ‘average years of education’in growth regressions. Applied Economics Letters, 16(9), 945-949.
Chicago Földvári, Péter, and Bas van Leeuwen. “An alternative interpretation of ‘average years of education’in growth regressions.” Applied Economics Letters 16, no. 9 (2009): 945-949.
Harvard Földvári, P. and van Leeuwen, B., 2009. An alternative interpretation of ‘average years of education’in growth regressions. Applied Economics Letters, 16(9), pp.945-949.
Vancouver Földvári P, van Leeuwen B. An alternative interpretation of ‘average years of education’in growth regressions. Applied Economics Letters. 2009 May 22;16(9):945-9.

Human Capital and Economic Growth in Asia 1890–2000: A Time‐series Analysis

when 2008
who Bas van Leeuwen

Péter Földvári

what journal Asian Economic Journal 
what paper Human Capital and Economic Growth in Asia 1890–2000: A Time-series Analysis
language English

involved project member(s)

Bas van Leeuwen Peter Foldvari
   

abstract

There is a general consensus that human capital is a major factor behind long-run economic growth. Yet, on a macro level, the empirical results do not always seem to concur with this view. To explain this gap between theory and empirics, more focus has been laid on measurement error and data quality. Using an alternative estimate of the stock of human capital, based on Judson (2002), we find evidence that the two major views on the role of human capital in economic development by Lucas (1988) and Romer (1990) coexist and are by no means mutually exclusive. Using a Johansen cointegration test, we find that in India and Indonesia the level of human capital is cointegrated with the level of aggregate income during the whole 20th century, which confirms the theory of Lucas (1988). In Japan, however, the Lucasian approach can be verified only for the first half of the century, while after 1950 there is cointegration between the growth rate of aggregate income and the level of human capital, which is in line with Romer’s view.

keywords

human capital; education; economic growth; time-series analysis; cointegration

link to paper page of the journal website

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8381.2008.00276.x/full

citation format

MLA Van Leeuwen, Bas, and Peter Foldvari. “Human Capital and Economic Growth in Asia 1890–2000: A Time‐series Analysis.” Asian Economic Journal 22.3 (2008): 225-240.
APA Van Leeuwen, B., & Foldvari, P. (2008). Human Capital and Economic Growth in Asia 1890–2000: A Time‐series Analysis. Asian Economic Journal, 22(3), 225-240.
Chicago Van Leeuwen, Bas, and Peter Foldvari. “Human Capital and Economic Growth in Asia 1890–2000: A Time‐series Analysis.” Asian Economic Journal 22, no. 3 (2008): 225-240.
Harvard Van Leeuwen, B. and Foldvari, P., 2008. Human Capital and Economic Growth in Asia 1890–2000: A Time‐series Analysis. Asian Economic Journal, 22(3), pp.225-240.
Vancouver Van Leeuwen B, Foldvari P. Human Capital and Economic Growth in Asia 1890–2000: A Time‐series Analysis. Asian Economic Journal. 2008 Sep 1;22(3):225-40.